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Gilby Clarke / Badmouth http://www.rocktopia.co.uk/media/reviews/photos/thumbnail/200x200s/36/08/07/2405_GilbyBadmouthconcertreviewthumb_1340818557.jpg Hot

Added by Central Electronic Brain     June 27, 2012    
 
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Gilby Clarke / Badmouth - Camden Underworld, London (UK) - 6th February 2012

The day after significant snowfall in the UK, Gilby Clarke and Badmouth entered these shores with heroic tales of cancelled flights, long car journeys and frozen ferry rides.

However, inside the Underworld this was all forgotten with Badmouth soon kicking out songs from their powerful and growing repertoire. Having recently released a superb second album (‘Heavy Metal Parking Lot’) and with a new single ‘To Watch The Bridges Burn’ in tow, the band was keen to prove they could do it live in the UK. They played the songs straight down the middle with no gimmicks, just a single guitar attack courtesy of Randy Joy, Chris LeMon´s omnipresent bass, drums by Rob Young and great vocals by Tom Pearsson. And by the way, they nailed their set. Notable songs were ‘Son of Sam’ (with one of the best riffs of 2011) and ‘Pedal To The Metal’ from their first album. Clearly pleased to be playing in an iconic UK rock venue, the Stockholm based band got the audience involved and the place started buzzing. One special event was a Jimi Hendrix-style guitar playing behind his back and with his mouth exhibition from Randy - entertaining but just short enough to still register an overall no-frills but note perfect performance. The standout track of the night, ‘Radiator’ was an explosive track and a good antidote metaphorically to the cold weather outside.

With further UK and French gigs to come and a support slot with WASP later in the year, Badmouth are set to be a frequent feature of the rock circuit.



The main act, Gilby Clarke, then came on stage in a very modest and unassuming way and plugged in his effects boxes and guitar lead, said hello and kicked off proceedings. He effortlessly launched into the first track ‘Wasn´t Yesterday Great’ from his 1997 album ‘Hangover’ and instantaneously showed a true class and charisma which is indeed very rare. His band comprised Chris LeMon and Rob Young from Badmouth; thus a simple three piece band but one which packed a punch. Gilby´s sojourn at Guns n´ Roses was a long time ago and it was nice to have a set which mainly saluted his solo work and other collaborations which now form a lengthy and impressive back catalogue. It was clear from the cheers that the crowd knew the non-Guns n´ Roses songs such as ‘Motorcycle Cowboys’, ‘Black’ and ‘Dead Flowers’ (from his ‘Pawn Shop Guitars’ album) which worked very well with this cut down three piece band. In particular, ‘Black’ with some soaring guitar work on his well-worn Gibson Les Paul was met with a lot of appreciation. Gilby is a fine lead guitarist in his own right and his understated style was a joy to watch and hear. The fact he had one guitar and very few effects (a bit of Fuzz Box but that was all) speaks volumes - his performance was about feel and not about over the top technicalities.

Of course, there had to be a couple of Guns n´ Roses songs and the choice was spot on with a frenetic version of ‘It´s So Easy’ which started a bit of over the top moshing in the crowd and a very well delivered ‘Knocking On Heaven´s Door’ which was unsurprisingly sung more like Axl Rose than Bob Dylan. These were not the encores though, but songs that worked in the context of the set and were part of Gilby´s cv and so would be churlish and wrong not to play.

The stand out song of the night and one which was being called out for from the beginning was ‘Tijuana Jail’; its tale of tequila and custodial sentencing got the crowd whipped up into a frenzy. With a big thank you to the audience, Gilby left the stage and cemented more of his rock and roll legacy into old London Town.

Rob McKenzie

The main act, Gilby Clarke, then came on stage in a very modest and unassuming way and plugged in his effects boxes and guitar lead, said hello and kicked off proceedings. He effortlessly launched into the first track ‘Wasn´t Yesterday Great’ from his 1997 album ‘Hangover’ and instantaneously showed a true class and charisma which is indeed very rare. His band comprised Chris LeMon and Rob Young from Badmouth; thus a simple three piece band but one which packed a punch. Gilby´s sojourn at Guns n´ Roses was a long time ago and it was nice to have a set which mainly saluted his solo work and other collaborations which now form a lengthy and impressive back catalogue. It was clear from the cheers that the crowd knew the non-Guns n´ Roses songs such as ‘Motorcycle Cowboys’, ‘Black’ and ‘Dead Flowers’ (from his ‘Pawn Shop Guitars’ album) which worked very well with this cut down three piece band. In particular, ‘Black’ with some soaring guitar work on his well-worn Gibson Les Paul was met with a lot of appreciation. Gilby is a fine lead guitarist in his own right and his understated style was a joy to watch and hear. The fact he had one guitar and very few effects (a bit of Fuzz Box but that was all) speaks volumes - his performance was about feel and not about over the top technicalities.

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